DIY hair bands!!

DIY Hair Bands In Every Color

80 hair bands! Easy. 20 yards of elastic in 20 colors. Some even with glitter.

Now the question is: what the hell am I supposed to do with eighty hair bands?

Materials:

  • stretch elastic (I purchased mine here) (I used 5/8″ elastic on the glitter and “fold over” elastic for the rest)

Instructions:

  • Measure elastic equivalent to wrap around the circumference of your wrist, leaving an extra inch on each side
  •  Cut the elastic (a sharp scissor is best to avoid fray; cut on a slight angle)
  • Hold the two ends of the elastic together and wrap them around one finger. Pull the two ends through the loop. (do not pull on the edges of the elastic or it will fray)
  • That’s it! I added mine to a card (actually recycled extra RSVP cards from our wedding) and added fun names to give as gifts.
  • Be impressed with yourself.

*Clarification required: By purple hazing, I just mean rocking out. Not doing psychodelic drugs 1960s-style.*

** Not going to make them? Anthropologie’s really are awesome (see here) or ShopBop sells a set of 18 (see here) **

this tutorial is from the amazing site http://www.loveumadly.com    :)

Knit Heart Dress Tutorial

Knit Heart Dress Tutorial

 

Materials:

  • Ready to wear dress or shirt with sleeves
  • Knit fabric
  • Scrap woven fabric
  • Scrap fabric for heart
  • Heart template
  • Stretch needle
  • Coordinating thread

Step 1:

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  • Take your ready to wear dress and pin the sleeves inside the dress so you can easily see the curve of the arm hole. This will make it easier to cut the same shape with your fabric for your new dress.
  • Fold your fabric making sure the stretch goes from left to right. Cut around the ready to wear dress leaving a 3/8″ seam allowance. Do this for the front of the dress as well as the back of the dress. Make sure your head opening is big enough to fit over your child’s head.

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  • Repeat for the sleeves

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  • Take your scrap fabric for your heart (making sure it is large enough to fit your heart template and an approximately 3/8″ seam allowance) and cut along the same angle as the dress
  • You should now have a dress front and back, two sleeves and heart fabric

Step 2:

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  • Make sure you install your stretch needle and turn your machine to your “lightning bolt” stitch or stretch stitch. On my machine it is stitch #3

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  • With RST pin the shoulders and sew using a 3/8″ seam allowance
  • Finish your seams with your serger (optional since the edges of knit fabric does not need finishing)

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  • Lay the dress front and back with right side up. Fold one of the sleeves in half and find the middle. Pin the middle of the sleeve to the shoulder seam with RST. Finish pinning the sleeve to the dress and sew. It is okay to slightly stretch the fabric in order for it to fit.
  • Repeat with the other sleeve

Step 3:

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  • With RST pin the sleeve and dress front and back and sew
  • Repeat on the other sideIMG_0046
  • With RST pin and sew the fabric for the heart

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  • Place your heart template on your fabric making sure you place it where you would like it to be sewn onto your dress. I wanted my heart just barely extending to the back of my dress so I have my side seam to the right side of my heart.
  • Cut out your heart leaving approximately 3/8″ seam allowance

Step 4:

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  • Place your scrap woven fabric on top of the right side of your dress. Pin the heart template to the top layer of your dress only. Make sure you place your heart exactly where your cut out fabric heart will go. I folded the side of my heart template where the seam is on the fabric heart to make sure I lined up the seam of the heart with the seam of the dress perfectly.
  • With a fabric pen trace around the heart template and sew on the line using a straight stitch. You could also leave your heart template pinned to your dress and sew just to the right of the template making sure not to sew the template to the dress. Make sure you are only sewing through one layer of the dress.

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  • Cut out the center of your heart making sure you don’t cut the back of your dress. Clip the corners and curves.

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  • pull the scrap fabric through the center of the heart and pin to the wrong side of the dress. Try your best to not stretch the fabric while pinning to keep the original shape of the heart. Sew the scrap fabric down using about a 1/4″ seam allowance.

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  • Cut the excess fabric off as close to the stitches as possible without cutting through the dress.

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  • Finish the edges on your heart with your serger or using a zig zap stitch. Place the heart over the heart opening and pin to the dress making sure to pin through only one layer of the dress. Turn the dress right side out and top stitch around the heart making sure not to stretch the heart as you go so it keeps its shape.

Step 5:

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  • Measure your neckline

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  • Cut a strip of your fabric the same length as your neckline and 1.5″ to make a neck binding. Make sure the stretch of the fabric goes from left to right.
  • Fold in half RST so the short ends are together and sew.

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  • Find the middle of the back neckline and pin the seam from your neck binding you just cut out. Finish pinning all the way across the neckline. Sew using your “lightning bolt” stitch.

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  • Fold the neck binding under halfway and then fold under again and pin and sew.

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  • Your neckline should now look like this.

Step 6:

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  • Fold your hem up 1/2″ and then again another 1/2″ and sew.
  • Repeat this process for both sleeves

Knit Heart Dress Sewing Tutorial - perfect for Valentine's Day!

  • You are FINISHED!! Enjoy your adorable new dress! Wear it just as it is in the warmer months or pair it with some leggings in the cooler months. It also makes the PERFECT Valentine’s Day dress without being too over the top.

 

 

Tutorial from the amazing website www.mesewcrazy.com

Picnic Dress

Making a picnic dress

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You will need 4 yards of 45″ fabric and an 18″ zipper.

These are the pieces of the pattern. Mark out the measurements listed and the distances between them. For example, on the waistband measure out the distance between your underbust/ribcage and your waist, then measure half your ribcage measurement at one side and half your waist measurement at the other. Then draw out the rest of the shape so it looks more or less like the pieces in the picture. If you aren’t used to making your own patterns it might be helpful to have a pattern for another dress to refer to, particularly for the sleeves.

Picnic-dress-pieces
  If you’re not used to making your own sleeves, trace both the arm hole and the top of the sleeve off a pattern you’ve used before and like. It’s tricky to get these curves right, and hard to move your arms if you get them wrong. I use gathered sleeves on this dress, which are a bit more forgiving. To change a regular set in sleeve to a gathered sleeve, simply make the top of the sleeve a bit larger without changing the arm hole. You will gather this extra, bringing the edge of the sleeve back to its original size.

To make the curve of the skirt even, use your tape measure like an enormous protractor. Pick a spot along the edge of the fabric to be the center of the skirt and draw a half circle by measuring a set distance (say 24 inches) from that point in every direction. This can go very quickly if you get someone else to hold the end of the tape measure in the middle. Make a smaller half circle around the same point for the waistline. The size of this inner circle will depend on your size, but should be something on the order of 5 inches.

 how-to-gather-750x499

To gather the top, mark out a distance ¾ of the difference between bust and underbust measurement on one side. Stitch along the edge of the fabric between these marks. Tie the threads together at one end. Pull slowly on one thread at the other end, gathering the fabric as you pull. When the gathered section is ⅓ of the length it began, tie the ends together. Repeat on the other side. Edit: if you still find this confusing, I’ve written more about it here http://www.oneaviandaemon.com/?p=863

After gathering both the lining and the top layer of the bodice, sew them together along the neckline. Turn right side out and press. Even out the gathers and make sure none of the edge bits are folded in, then sew both pieces of the bodice to the waist band, being careful with the gathered sections.

 bust-detail-750x499

Sew the edge of the facing to the neckline on each back piece. Turn and press. Turn in the edge of the facing and sew this edge to the back.

Sew the front and back together at the shoulders. Gather the center of each sleeve. Sew the sleeves into the armholes.

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Baste the ties to the waist band, then sew the front and back together along the side. The waistband will be sewn into this seam. Sew up the underside of the sleeve. Turn under the edge of the sleeve and sew it down.

Sew in the pockets if you’re including them (for more detailed directions, see here). Sew up the sides (but not the back) of the skirt, and sew the skirt to the top. Put in the zipper, then sew up the back of the skirt.

Turn under ½ inch all along the bottom of the skirt, then another 2 ½ inches. Hem along this edge, taking the smallest stitches you can out of the skirt.

If there’s anything you’d like to know that I’ve skipped or explained badly, please ask about it!

 

From – http://www.oneaviandaemon.com 

New Foxes For Sale

Brand new Fox cushions are for sale on my Etsy Site!! They come in all different colours and sizes, so please request what ever you fancy :)

https://www.etsy.com/uk/shop/GemBobsCrafts

DIY :: VINTAGE SHEET SKETCH JOURNAL

 I wanted to throw together a super quick journal with blank pages that could be used for throwing in a purse, taking along, and using for sketches. I decided to use a vintage sheet (and a vintage button), lined with white fabric for a cover, a button and tie closure, and blank recycled paper pages.

 Supplies:
+ 9″x12″ piece of vintage sheet fabric (or any fabric)
+ 9″x12″ piece of white fabric
+ large button
+ 7″ piece of decorative ribbon
+ 10 sheets blank recycled computer paper
+ needle and thread
+ sewing machine, scissors (for trimming)
+ butterfly document clips (to hold pages in place while sewing, not pictured)

Begin by sewing the button to the vintage sheet. This way the thread won’t show through on the inside cover. Next, pin the sheet to the white fabric, and pin the piece of decorative ribbon opposite and lined up with the button (see picture).

I simply sewed the two pieces together with about a 1/2″ seam allowance. I started where the ribbon was pinned to reinforce it.

Sew all around the perimeter and then you have a nice looking little journal shell.

Using the document clips, clip the paper in place, centered on all sides of the fabric shell (sorry for the weird blurry picture!)

I measured in 5.5″ and made a couple marks so I would know where to sew down the middle.

Sew down the middle and backstitch on both ends. Trim the extra threads off.

Voila! A quick and easy vintage sheet sketch journal :)

 
 
from the beautiful blog http://thecreativeplace.blogspot.co.uk
 

 

Butterflies

 

 

 

Here are a few new things that i have been working on :) Its a brand new year and i was ready for a change in what i was creating. I have always adored butterflies so really wanted to try out making a few, will definitely be making some more of these!!

imageimage[1] image[2]

Also tried out this cute dog pillow :)

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Ive got loads more ideas to have a go at as well which will keep me busy for a while!! If you have any ideas that you think i should try please feel free to comment!

 

xxxxx

Clouddss!!

New items in my shop! Head over there to get some cute new cushions, owls, elephants, bunting, cards and more!!! :)
Happy New Year to EVERYONE!
http://www.gembobs.co.uk

flat bottom zippy pouch to make as gifts!! :)

Pattern: Flat bottom straight(ish) sides zippy pouch (with a little zipper trick)

I love the method of sewing across two corners of a pouch or bag to create a flat bottom (this post is going to sound a bit like a cosmetic surgery clinic brochure at times I fear), but sometimes I don’t want the sides of the bag/pouch slope inwards towards the base. I knew that this had to be solvable through the careful application of trigonometry, so…. I decided just to take a guess at how to solve it (‘cos I’m no mathematician). After a few false starts, I managed to draw this pattern which creates a straight-ish sided pouch with a flat bottom. The finished pouch is 9″ wide, 7″ high and around 3″ deep at the base.

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I also have an issue with the standard way of doing zip ends. I love to use zip end covers because it gives such a great-looking finish, but I don’t like the fact that you run the risk of getting a hole between the zip end and the side of the pouch. I’ve tweaked this method a little to provide a foolproof finish, by extending the zip end cover past the end of the zip and into the line of the seam. I haven’t seen another method that does it quite like this, but please forgive me if this is a really well known way and I just think I have invented it!

Before you start you need to download and print the pdf pattern. After a considerable quantity of wasted paper testing this, I have found that using Google Chrome or the most up-to-date version of Adobe is the best way to open up the pattern once you have downloaded it. You need to make sure that your paper is oriented to landscapeand ‘fit to page’ or ‘shrink to fit’ is disabled. There is a line marked on the pattern that should measure 6″ –  if it doesn’t, then your printer is definitely shrinking to fit, and you need to try again! Once you have printed the pattern, cut it out and match the sections together, aligning the dotted lines and taping into place. You will have 2 pattern pieces – one for the interfacing/fleece, and one for the fabrics.

You will need:

Fabric for outer
Fabric for lining
Iron-on medium weight interfacing
Fusible fleece (low loft or high loft, depending on the weight of the outer fabric you are using – I would use low loft with thicker fabrics).
10″ (minimum) zip
sewing machine and zipper foot

Preparing the fabrics

Cut out two pieces of outer fabric and two pieces of lining fabric, using the larger pattern piece. Cut out 2 pieces of fusible fleece and 2 pieces of iron using the small pattern piece. Cut 2 pieces of fabric 4″ by 1″ – these will form the zip end covers.

Fuse one piece of fleece so it is positioned centrally on one of the outer pieces of fabric, like this:

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Repeat with the other piece of fusible fleece and outer fabric. Then interface the 2 lining pieces of fabric with the medium-weight iron-on interfacing, aligning it centrally, in the same way.

Preparing the zip

Take one of the 4″ by 1″ pieces of fabric and fold it in half widthways (middle line in the picture), then mark two lines 3/4″ away from the short edges, as indicated in the photograph.

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Fold the two edges inwards on these two lines (1), press, and then and then fold in half again (2) and press.

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Repeat to create the other zip end tab. Put to one side whilst you sort out the zip.

Trim the open end of the zip so that it measures 3/4″ past the end of the zip stop (you probably wont have to trim much).

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Then measure 9″ from the trimmed end and mark a line and trim the zip to this line.

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I put a dot of glue or clear nail varnish on this end of the zip to keep it closed. Another option is to zig-zag stitch over it.

Open up one of the fabric zip end covers and place one end of the zip inside, aligned with folded-in edge (as in the picture below), not with the central fold as you normally would. I use my glue pen (mine is a Sewline) heavily at this point to glue the zip into position. You could use pins, but IMO your life will change for the better when you invest in a glue pen, so do it….

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Now fold the zip cover  in the middle, on the fold line you made earlier, using more glue or pins to hold it in place – it will look like this, and there with some of the zip end cover extending past the end of the zip:

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Repeat with the other zip end cover.

It’s finally time to get the sewing machine out….

Stitch the zip end covers in place close to the edge nearest the zip. I like to use 2 rows of stitching, but you don’t have to!

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Place one piece of outer fabric, right side up, and align the zip, face down, with the top edge, like this:

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Position one of the lining pieces on top, right sides together with the outer piece, and so the zip is sandwiched between the outer and the lining. I use loads of glue again here (on both sides of the top fabric part of the zip) to hold the zip/fabric sandwich together… You can use pins, but glue is awesome (really).

Fit a zipper foot to your sewing machine and sew along the line indicated in the photo. 

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You will need to fiddle about with the zip pull to move it out of the way as you sew. My usual technique is to start with the zip pull in the middle of the zip, then sew along until I get as close to it as I can. Then I raise the zipper foot, but keep the needle lowered, and move the zip pull back where I have just sewn, so it is out of the way. Then I put the zipper foot back down again, and away I go to the end.

Repeat all of that with the other two pieces of fabric, on the other side of the zip.

The finishing zip touch is to top stitch along the zip edge on the outside of the pouch. Open out the two side and press the lining and outer fabric thoroughly away from the zip. Then (still with the zipper foot attached), stitch where indicated in the photo, nice and close to the line where the fabric meets the zip.

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Don’t forget, if your lining fabric is a completely different colour to the outside, you can, if you want to, use a different colour bobbin thread a this point (that might be obvious to you, but it took me a while to figure that one out).

Sewing it all up

Now for the fun bit… Make sure your zip is at least 3″  UNZIPPED now or you’ll be very sad later when you can’t turn your pouch the right way round… Line up your fabrics so that the outer pieces are right sides together, and the lining pieces are right sides together too. You should end up with something that looks like this:

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See how the zip is there in the middle, and the outer and lining fabrics are pulled to either side of it. Pin all round the edges (sorry I took my photo before I finished pinning).  There is a lumpy area round the zip that you need to pinch flat in order to sew. Fold the zip cover flat so that it is sandwiched between the 2 pieces of outerfabric, like this:

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Once you have pinned everything into place you need to stitch the sides and the bottom of the pouch, leaving the 2 small L-shaped cut outs at the bottom unstitched, and also leaving a 3″ gap on one of the sides so that you can turn your pouch right side out later.

So, stitch where I’ve marked with the dotted lines, with a 3/8″ seam allowance (you will be stitching pretty much along the edge of the interfacing). Remember to do a bit of reverse stitching on each side of the gap you are leaving for turning, or you run the risk of your stitching coming undone when you turn the pouch through.

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The final stage before you can turn the pouch right side out, is to stitch the bottom corners of the pouch. Working on one corner, pull the 2 inner angles of the L-shape apart, and open up the L-shaped section. Align the bottom seam and the side seam of the pouch and line up the two edges of the unsewn corners at right angles to the seams, like this:

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You should be able to see how you are creating the nice boxy base to your pouch. If it doesn’t look right, it probably isn’t – have another go before you sew! Stitch across the corner, reverse stitching at each end because this bit of stitching needs to be very firm. Repeat this process with the other 3 corners.

Now it’s time to turn the pouch right side out to check all is OK – I always do this before I trim any seams! If you are happy with how it looks (use a crochet hook or knitting needle to push out the zip covers to check they look good), then turn inside out again and trim the seams to 1/4″. Then turn it back through, sew up the turning hole with ladder stitch and then give the whole thing a thorough pressing. And you are all finished!

Kitty in the house pouch

I’d love to know how you get on with my zippy pouch suggestions – any feedback is much appreciated.

 

reblogged from the amazing

 http://veryberryhandmade.co.uk :)

Etsyyyy for Your extra special Christmas Pressies!!

Hi guys, well.. its the 25th of November and christmas is close. Have you got your Christmas presents sorted out?? You may have seen lots of advertising for ‘Not on the high street’… Which is fab! But!!! Its very expensive and sometimes limited.

Etsy is brilliant and not advertised enough in my opinion. It has lots of different items for sale and you can pick up soooo many bargains. A lot of my friends sell on there too!! So head over there and grab some things for christmas.

Happy Shopping! By the way my friends Etsy sites are here if you wanted to take a look.

https://www.etsy.com/uk/shop/BeaksandBobbins

https://www.etsy.com/uk/shop/ChristiesChiChiCraft

Tutorial, using heart tins as shelves!!!

 

 

 

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1.) Basically, take a heart shaped tin with a holey/lacy edge. If your tin doesn’t have ready made holes it would be simple enough to carefully 3x drill holes at each side where the tin touches the wall and one near the point where the corner of the wall will be.
2.)Using a pencil, hold your tin against the wall and mark where the holes are. Hammer in the nail part of the way to start off the hole. When you are happy that the tin shelf is straight and in the right place, hammer in the nail leaving 2cm protuding (this will help to secure the shelf). If you want your shelf to hold heavier objects then you will need to use screws/wall plugs and a screwdriver or drill to fix to the wall. I was happy for my shelf to be securely fixed using nails, as I knew that I would place only small light objects on top.
3.) Find appropriate trinkets, place on top and admire! I have used 3D paper houses, a jar of buttons & plastic flowers, a heart shaped doily, an origami flower (left over from my wedding), and one of my ice cream van brooches to decorate the shelves.

 

reblogged from the amazing http://www.curiousclaredesigns.com/

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