Picnic Dress

Making a picnic dress

picnic-dress-499x750

You will need 4 yards of 45″ fabric and an 18″ zipper.

These are the pieces of the pattern. Mark out the measurements listed and the distances between them. For example, on the waistband measure out the distance between your underbust/ribcage and your waist, then measure half your ribcage measurement at one side and half your waist measurement at the other. Then draw out the rest of the shape so it looks more or less like the pieces in the picture. If you aren’t used to making your own patterns it might be helpful to have a pattern for another dress to refer to, particularly for the sleeves.

Picnic-dress-pieces
  If you’re not used to making your own sleeves, trace both the arm hole and the top of the sleeve off a pattern you’ve used before and like. It’s tricky to get these curves right, and hard to move your arms if you get them wrong. I use gathered sleeves on this dress, which are a bit more forgiving. To change a regular set in sleeve to a gathered sleeve, simply make the top of the sleeve a bit larger without changing the arm hole. You will gather this extra, bringing the edge of the sleeve back to its original size.

To make the curve of the skirt even, use your tape measure like an enormous protractor. Pick a spot along the edge of the fabric to be the center of the skirt and draw a half circle by measuring a set distance (say 24 inches) from that point in every direction. This can go very quickly if you get someone else to hold the end of the tape measure in the middle. Make a smaller half circle around the same point for the waistline. The size of this inner circle will depend on your size, but should be something on the order of 5 inches.

 how-to-gather-750x499

To gather the top, mark out a distance ¾ of the difference between bust and underbust measurement on one side. Stitch along the edge of the fabric between these marks. Tie the threads together at one end. Pull slowly on one thread at the other end, gathering the fabric as you pull. When the gathered section is ⅓ of the length it began, tie the ends together. Repeat on the other side. Edit: if you still find this confusing, I’ve written more about it here http://www.oneaviandaemon.com/?p=863

After gathering both the lining and the top layer of the bodice, sew them together along the neckline. Turn right side out and press. Even out the gathers and make sure none of the edge bits are folded in, then sew both pieces of the bodice to the waist band, being careful with the gathered sections.

 bust-detail-750x499

Sew the edge of the facing to the neckline on each back piece. Turn and press. Turn in the edge of the facing and sew this edge to the back.

Sew the front and back together at the shoulders. Gather the center of each sleeve. Sew the sleeves into the armholes.

back-bow-551x750

Baste the ties to the waist band, then sew the front and back together along the side. The waistband will be sewn into this seam. Sew up the underside of the sleeve. Turn under the edge of the sleeve and sew it down.

Sew in the pockets if you’re including them (for more detailed directions, see here). Sew up the sides (but not the back) of the skirt, and sew the skirt to the top. Put in the zipper, then sew up the back of the skirt.

Turn under ½ inch all along the bottom of the skirt, then another 2 ½ inches. Hem along this edge, taking the smallest stitches you can out of the skirt.

If there’s anything you’d like to know that I’ve skipped or explained badly, please ask about it!

 

From – http://www.oneaviandaemon.com 

New Foxes For Sale

Brand new Fox cushions are for sale on my Etsy Site!! They come in all different colours and sizes, so please request what ever you fancy :)

https://www.etsy.com/uk/shop/GemBobsCrafts

DIY :: VINTAGE SHEET SKETCH JOURNAL

 I wanted to throw together a super quick journal with blank pages that could be used for throwing in a purse, taking along, and using for sketches. I decided to use a vintage sheet (and a vintage button), lined with white fabric for a cover, a button and tie closure, and blank recycled paper pages.

 Supplies:
+ 9″x12″ piece of vintage sheet fabric (or any fabric)
+ 9″x12″ piece of white fabric
+ large button
+ 7″ piece of decorative ribbon
+ 10 sheets blank recycled computer paper
+ needle and thread
+ sewing machine, scissors (for trimming)
+ butterfly document clips (to hold pages in place while sewing, not pictured)

Begin by sewing the button to the vintage sheet. This way the thread won’t show through on the inside cover. Next, pin the sheet to the white fabric, and pin the piece of decorative ribbon opposite and lined up with the button (see picture).

I simply sewed the two pieces together with about a 1/2″ seam allowance. I started where the ribbon was pinned to reinforce it.

Sew all around the perimeter and then you have a nice looking little journal shell.

Using the document clips, clip the paper in place, centered on all sides of the fabric shell (sorry for the weird blurry picture!)

I measured in 5.5″ and made a couple marks so I would know where to sew down the middle.

Sew down the middle and backstitch on both ends. Trim the extra threads off.

Voila! A quick and easy vintage sheet sketch journal :)

 
 
from the beautiful blog http://thecreativeplace.blogspot.co.uk
 

 

Butterflies

 

 

 

Here are a few new things that i have been working on :) Its a brand new year and i was ready for a change in what i was creating. I have always adored butterflies so really wanted to try out making a few, will definitely be making some more of these!!

imageimage[1] image[2]

Also tried out this cute dog pillow :)

image[4]image[3]

 

Ive got loads more ideas to have a go at as well which will keep me busy for a while!! If you have any ideas that you think i should try please feel free to comment!

 

xxxxx

Clouddss!!

New items in my shop! Head over there to get some cute new cushions, owls, elephants, bunting, cards and more!!! :)
Happy New Year to EVERYONE!
http://www.gembobs.co.uk

flat bottom zippy pouch to make as gifts!! :)

Pattern: Flat bottom straight(ish) sides zippy pouch (with a little zipper trick)

I love the method of sewing across two corners of a pouch or bag to create a flat bottom (this post is going to sound a bit like a cosmetic surgery clinic brochure at times I fear), but sometimes I don’t want the sides of the bag/pouch slope inwards towards the base. I knew that this had to be solvable through the careful application of trigonometry, so…. I decided just to take a guess at how to solve it (‘cos I’m no mathematician). After a few false starts, I managed to draw this pattern which creates a straight-ish sided pouch with a flat bottom. The finished pouch is 9″ wide, 7″ high and around 3″ deep at the base.

IMG_9514

I also have an issue with the standard way of doing zip ends. I love to use zip end covers because it gives such a great-looking finish, but I don’t like the fact that you run the risk of getting a hole between the zip end and the side of the pouch. I’ve tweaked this method a little to provide a foolproof finish, by extending the zip end cover past the end of the zip and into the line of the seam. I haven’t seen another method that does it quite like this, but please forgive me if this is a really well known way and I just think I have invented it!

Before you start you need to download and print the pdf pattern. After a considerable quantity of wasted paper testing this, I have found that using Google Chrome or the most up-to-date version of Adobe is the best way to open up the pattern once you have downloaded it. You need to make sure that your paper is oriented to landscapeand ‘fit to page’ or ‘shrink to fit’ is disabled. There is a line marked on the pattern that should measure 6″ –  if it doesn’t, then your printer is definitely shrinking to fit, and you need to try again! Once you have printed the pattern, cut it out and match the sections together, aligning the dotted lines and taping into place. You will have 2 pattern pieces – one for the interfacing/fleece, and one for the fabrics.

You will need:

Fabric for outer
Fabric for lining
Iron-on medium weight interfacing
Fusible fleece (low loft or high loft, depending on the weight of the outer fabric you are using – I would use low loft with thicker fabrics).
10″ (minimum) zip
sewing machine and zipper foot

Preparing the fabrics

Cut out two pieces of outer fabric and two pieces of lining fabric, using the larger pattern piece. Cut out 2 pieces of fusible fleece and 2 pieces of iron using the small pattern piece. Cut 2 pieces of fabric 4″ by 1″ – these will form the zip end covers.

Fuse one piece of fleece so it is positioned centrally on one of the outer pieces of fabric, like this:

IMG_9484

Repeat with the other piece of fusible fleece and outer fabric. Then interface the 2 lining pieces of fabric with the medium-weight iron-on interfacing, aligning it centrally, in the same way.

Preparing the zip

Take one of the 4″ by 1″ pieces of fabric and fold it in half widthways (middle line in the picture), then mark two lines 3/4″ away from the short edges, as indicated in the photograph.

IMG_9466

Fold the two edges inwards on these two lines (1), press, and then and then fold in half again (2) and press.

IMG_9469

Repeat to create the other zip end tab. Put to one side whilst you sort out the zip.

Trim the open end of the zip so that it measures 3/4″ past the end of the zip stop (you probably wont have to trim much).

IMG_9470
Then measure 9″ from the trimmed end and mark a line and trim the zip to this line.

IMG_9472

I put a dot of glue or clear nail varnish on this end of the zip to keep it closed. Another option is to zig-zag stitch over it.

Open up one of the fabric zip end covers and place one end of the zip inside, aligned with folded-in edge (as in the picture below), not with the central fold as you normally would. I use my glue pen (mine is a Sewline) heavily at this point to glue the zip into position. You could use pins, but IMO your life will change for the better when you invest in a glue pen, so do it….

IMG_9475

Now fold the zip cover  in the middle, on the fold line you made earlier, using more glue or pins to hold it in place – it will look like this, and there with some of the zip end cover extending past the end of the zip:

IMG_9477

Repeat with the other zip end cover.

It’s finally time to get the sewing machine out….

Stitch the zip end covers in place close to the edge nearest the zip. I like to use 2 rows of stitching, but you don’t have to!

IMG_9486

Place one piece of outer fabric, right side up, and align the zip, face down, with the top edge, like this:

IMG_9490

Position one of the lining pieces on top, right sides together with the outer piece, and so the zip is sandwiched between the outer and the lining. I use loads of glue again here (on both sides of the top fabric part of the zip) to hold the zip/fabric sandwich together… You can use pins, but glue is awesome (really).

Fit a zipper foot to your sewing machine and sew along the line indicated in the photo. 

IMG_9491

You will need to fiddle about with the zip pull to move it out of the way as you sew. My usual technique is to start with the zip pull in the middle of the zip, then sew along until I get as close to it as I can. Then I raise the zipper foot, but keep the needle lowered, and move the zip pull back where I have just sewn, so it is out of the way. Then I put the zipper foot back down again, and away I go to the end.

Repeat all of that with the other two pieces of fabric, on the other side of the zip.

The finishing zip touch is to top stitch along the zip edge on the outside of the pouch. Open out the two side and press the lining and outer fabric thoroughly away from the zip. Then (still with the zipper foot attached), stitch where indicated in the photo, nice and close to the line where the fabric meets the zip.

IMG_9496

Don’t forget, if your lining fabric is a completely different colour to the outside, you can, if you want to, use a different colour bobbin thread a this point (that might be obvious to you, but it took me a while to figure that one out).

Sewing it all up

Now for the fun bit… Make sure your zip is at least 3″  UNZIPPED now or you’ll be very sad later when you can’t turn your pouch the right way round… Line up your fabrics so that the outer pieces are right sides together, and the lining pieces are right sides together too. You should end up with something that looks like this:

IMG_9495

See how the zip is there in the middle, and the outer and lining fabrics are pulled to either side of it. Pin all round the edges (sorry I took my photo before I finished pinning).  There is a lumpy area round the zip that you need to pinch flat in order to sew. Fold the zip cover flat so that it is sandwiched between the 2 pieces of outerfabric, like this:

IMG_9502

Once you have pinned everything into place you need to stitch the sides and the bottom of the pouch, leaving the 2 small L-shaped cut outs at the bottom unstitched, and also leaving a 3″ gap on one of the sides so that you can turn your pouch right side out later.

So, stitch where I’ve marked with the dotted lines, with a 3/8″ seam allowance (you will be stitching pretty much along the edge of the interfacing). Remember to do a bit of reverse stitching on each side of the gap you are leaving for turning, or you run the risk of your stitching coming undone when you turn the pouch through.

IMG_9498

The final stage before you can turn the pouch right side out, is to stitch the bottom corners of the pouch. Working on one corner, pull the 2 inner angles of the L-shape apart, and open up the L-shaped section. Align the bottom seam and the side seam of the pouch and line up the two edges of the unsewn corners at right angles to the seams, like this:

IMG_9504

You should be able to see how you are creating the nice boxy base to your pouch. If it doesn’t look right, it probably isn’t – have another go before you sew! Stitch across the corner, reverse stitching at each end because this bit of stitching needs to be very firm. Repeat this process with the other 3 corners.

Now it’s time to turn the pouch right side out to check all is OK – I always do this before I trim any seams! If you are happy with how it looks (use a crochet hook or knitting needle to push out the zip covers to check they look good), then turn inside out again and trim the seams to 1/4″. Then turn it back through, sew up the turning hole with ladder stitch and then give the whole thing a thorough pressing. And you are all finished!

Kitty in the house pouch

I’d love to know how you get on with my zippy pouch suggestions – any feedback is much appreciated.

 

reblogged from the amazing

 http://veryberryhandmade.co.uk :)

Etsyyyy for Your extra special Christmas Pressies!!

Hi guys, well.. its the 25th of November and christmas is close. Have you got your Christmas presents sorted out?? You may have seen lots of advertising for ‘Not on the high street’… Which is fab! But!!! Its very expensive and sometimes limited.

Etsy is brilliant and not advertised enough in my opinion. It has lots of different items for sale and you can pick up soooo many bargains. A lot of my friends sell on there too!! So head over there and grab some things for christmas.

Happy Shopping! By the way my friends Etsy sites are here if you wanted to take a look.

https://www.etsy.com/uk/shop/BeaksandBobbins

https://www.etsy.com/uk/shop/ChristiesChiChiCraft

Tutorial, using heart tins as shelves!!!

 

 

 

Image

 

 

Image

 

1.) Basically, take a heart shaped tin with a holey/lacy edge. If your tin doesn’t have ready made holes it would be simple enough to carefully 3x drill holes at each side where the tin touches the wall and one near the point where the corner of the wall will be.
2.)Using a pencil, hold your tin against the wall and mark where the holes are. Hammer in the nail part of the way to start off the hole. When you are happy that the tin shelf is straight and in the right place, hammer in the nail leaving 2cm protuding (this will help to secure the shelf). If you want your shelf to hold heavier objects then you will need to use screws/wall plugs and a screwdriver or drill to fix to the wall. I was happy for my shelf to be securely fixed using nails, as I knew that I would place only small light objects on top.
3.) Find appropriate trinkets, place on top and admire! I have used 3D paper houses, a jar of buttons & plastic flowers, a heart shaped doily, an origami flower (left over from my wedding), and one of my ice cream van brooches to decorate the shelves.

 

reblogged from the amazing http://www.curiousclaredesigns.com/

silhouette pendant necklaces

 
 
hope your mother’s day was lovely ♥
i just want to say how touched i am 
the love & sweet words that flooded my email & comments were so kind!
the thought that you all would love my little space so much was amazing…
i can’t wait to hear all about what you’ve done with new ideas
 
(oh, and for those who asked about plans for the table construction…
the hubs is going to work something up for me, 
since he did have graph paper plans and i’ve since lost them! yikes…
i’ll try to put something up within the next week)
 
my girlfriend made beautiful pendants with silhouettes of her two daughters 
inspired from pinterest … and i knew when i saw them i wanted to give them a try!
using a tutorial from Jones Design Company
download paint.net
(which is simple to use once you get a feel for it)
i made my girls’ silhouettes and added vintage flower graphics from here
i made one for myself and another for my mom
though these would really be a sweet gift for any occasion
 
 
pendants are from Hobby Lobby
chains were from Joanns
 
 
 
skipping the top coats over the faces resulted in the dimensional magic seeping through my paper, leaving blotchy marks that were not cute…shoulda taken a pic for you to see :(
i would say do 2-3 coats taking care to go right up to the edges (don’t worry it all dries clear)
 
 
 
this was my first time experimenting with dimensional magic…it’s well…magic!
in the top pic you can see the sheen from just the mod podge, the second shows the 
D-magic…it applies very cloudy, but also dries clear…
the package recommends 3 hours drying time
i left mine overnight and noticed in the a.m. that when it dries it sorta shrinks
you can keep adding layers of dimensional magic until you’re happy with how it looks…
i was going for a beveled/dome/more puffy effect :)
it will dry clear each time
the jump rings are optional…it can be hung directly from a link on the chain
to have the pendants lay more flat, put them on the ring, 
then add the ring to a link on your chain 
 
 
 
 
reblogged fromhttp://raisinguprubies.blogspot.co.uk

Make the cutest hedgehog!!!

Make a hedgehog pincushion – tutorial

 

This is the cutest ever pin cushion and will look so good on your craft table!!

Reblogged from the wonderful http://maker-land.blogspot.com.au/ 

Have a look at their blogs they are seriously amazing! :) Happy sewing.

 

I love hedgehogs.  I would consider moving to New Zealand just so that I could have them living in my yard, even though I hear that they can be a real nuisance.  Oh, but they are so cute!  And to be able to say hedgehogs live at the bottom of your garden would be a rather amazing thing to say, as if you lived in a children’s story book.  They are certainly a nicer looking than the snotty slugs and fuzzy-fat-goo-squirting caterpillars I keep accidentally stepping on in my own garden.  Blerk.

I remember my mother making me one of these when I was very young and just beginning to sew.  It’s a perfect addition to a youngsters first sewing kit.  The faux fur does a great job of emulating a hedgehog’s spines, but you don’t have to use fur.  Maybe a fun printed cotton or some towelling.  Of course, she won’t look as prickly, but you’ll just have to stick more pins in her!

What you need:

- 20cm square (or equivalent measure) of fabric (we’ll call this ‘fabric 1′) for head, belly and ears.  I used a woollen fabric which, although looks great all finished, was an absolute SOD to work with on such a small scale.  Lots of fraying.  If you have some about  and you also have the patience of a saint, by all means, use it.  A strong cotton or linen would be less taxing on the nerves.

- 20cm square of fabric (fabric 2) for the back.  As mentioned faux fur is great, but towelling or cotton is fine, too.

- Sewing needle and strong thread.  The smaller ear pieces and some of the curves are best tackled with hand sewing.

- Polyfill stuffing.

- 2 black seed beads for eyes.

- 50cm black embroidery thread or perle cotton for embroidering nose.  Or you could use a bead or tiny pompom instead.

- Embroidery needle for embroidering nose.

- Optional ribbon for bow.

What you do:

Print out the pattern sheet and cut out the pieces (click on the image below to view full size image, then right click and save as a file, then print it).  On the head piece, mark the nose because it helps!  All pattern pieces include a 0.5 centimetre seam allowance.  

 

From fabric 1, cut one belly piece.  Fold remainder of fabric in half and cut two head pieces (that are a mirror image of each other) and four ears.


From fabric 2, cut 2 back pieces (again, that are a mirror image of each other).  *Important note – if using fur fabric or towelling, be sure to cut the piece with the nap (pile).  For more information about this, read this.

With right sides facing stitch ear pieces together (because these are so tiny, it’s best to hand sew these with backstitch).  Carefully clip seams, turn and press.

Pinch a pleat in the ears as shown, and securing with a few stitches.

Place ears on body pieces about halfway up edge with pleats facing upwards.  Baste securely.

Place one head piece and one body piece right sides together, and stitch, making sure you catch that ear in nice and tight.  Give it a very light press from the back (if using fur, pressing will flatten the pile, but you can brush it up again with your fingers.)

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 Do the same with the other head and body piece to give you a mirror image.  Ta-daa!

 Now, place the two piece together and pin.  If using fur, comb it as best you can away from the edge so you don’t sew too much of it in the seam (see the above link again for tips on how to sew fur).  Stitch from the back end all the way to the tip of the nose.  Clip carefully, and turn out, and carefully comb out any fur that may have been caught in the seam.

Time to sew on the belly!  Remembering that the pointy end of the belly piece meets the nose, place body and belly pieces with the wrong sides together, pin and stitch, leaving a gap open at the rear end (about a half inch either side of the back seam) so she can be stuffed.  You may wish to hand-sew the tricky bits around the nose (although I had no trouble; it doesn’t have to be absolutely perfect – embroidering the nose will help hide any minor hiccups!)

Again, clip seams and carefully turn out.

Stuff firmly with polyfill, paying special attention to the nose, (something long, thin and blunt will help here too) and the face area in general.  Shape your hedgehog gently in your hands to flatten the bottom so she doesn’t roll about too much.

When you’re happy with your stuffing job, it’s time to sew her up.  The belly piece left open at the back can get a bit flappy, so take your needle and thread and hand-gather along the seam line, and pull gently on the thread, drawing up the fabric until the belly and back opening edges are a pretty good match in size.  Turn in edges of the belly and back pieces and sew the seam shut with a close ladder stitch.

For the face, thread up your embroidery needle with your black embroidery thread.  Tie a knot in the loose end.  Enter your needle through the tip of the nose and out through the face into the position of where you want the first eye to be sewn.  Thread the first bead on and slide it down the thread, then the needle re-enters the head at the point of the first eye position and exits on the other side in the second eye position.

(Tip! If  you place the eyes to close together, your hedgehog will look more like  a hairy rat.  Things look cuter and more gormless when their eyes are place further away from each other.  That’s not to say hedgehogs are gormless, but they definitely aren’t shifty looking either, even though they may well be sneaky creatures).  Thread the second bead on and slide it down the thread.  Pass the needle through the head again back to the other eye and through it’s hole again, pulling the thread slightly to indent the eyes.  Pass the needle back and forth a few times between the eyes, making sure they are secure.

 

When you’re finished with the eyes, bring the needle back out through the nose.  Cut the tail hanging from the nose (but leave the knot!)  To make the nose, embroider a few very small satin stitches around the knot left on the nose.  When you’re happy with her nose, cut the thread and you’re done!

 
You can then fancy her up with a cute little bow if you like, or embellish her in any other way you might think of.   She would make a lovely wrist-band type of pincushion if you sewed her to a band of elastic to fit your wrist, making her look like she’s taking a stroll up your arm.  Oh, and don’t forget to stick some pins in her bottom.
 
 
Although she’s very handy as a pin cushion in mini-size, you could try enlarging the pattern and making a larger hedgehog as a toy or a decorative cushion for a child’s (or adult’s) bed.  Not as handy, nor mini, but she would still look very cute.
 
     
Gemma xx 

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.
The Esquire Theme.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 2,015 other followers