Flow Magazine

This magazine is my favourite read ever.. Honestly its such a lovely, escaping, mindful, interesting, peaceful, inspirational magazine that fills you with hope and ideas! Please take a look at their website and trot down to WH Smiths and get one!! You will not regret it honestly!!

 

Here is a link to the websites inspiring quotes which everyone loves a bit of!

http://www.flowmagazine.com/category/quotes-that-inspire-us

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Hoop Earrings

I adore this fun jewelry tutorial. I hope you do, too! -http://www.creaturecomfortsblog.com/

I originally made a neon green version of these hoops for an 80’s Halloween party­–perfect under the black lights. When I went to pick colors for this tutorial, however, I pulled this more gentle color palette with a punch of black. I think it’s so lovely. These hoops are simple to make, yet such a fun splash of hand made in your wardrobe. Add the ability to customize every pair and you might just not be able to stop making them. I adore these little black and white ones.

 
These hoops make for a fabulous last minute, personalized gifts, too!  Here’s the tutorial:
 
 

Supplies needed:

  • Embroidery thread (I suggest DMC 6-strand floss for a smooth finish)
  • Inexpensive hoop earrings (I found these at Target)
  • Craft glue
  • Scissors

Cut 40” of chosen embroidery thread colors for a large hoop, less for smaller hoops. If you place the hoops in your ear before you start, it will help you decide where to change colors and place the majority of your design color work (remove hoop from ear before next step).

Start by placing a small bit of craft glue at the end of the hoop.  

Take desired embroidery thread colors and line them up parallel to the hoop, placing the end of the thread in the bit of glue. Choose the thread color you want to start with and begin wrapping it around the hoop…the other colors you aren’t using they go along for the ride (make sure they are being hidden by the thread color that you want to have showing). Keep wrapped thread snugly side-by-side so you can’t see the hoop or other colors underneath.

When you want to change colors, drop the first color parallel to the hoop and start wrapping with the next color you’d like. Repeat to change colors again. Change as many times as you’d like.  

When you get to the end, place another small bit of glue. Wrap thread directly over that glue, using your finger to wipe away any excess. Trim the embroidery thread colors that you are not using first as close to the hoop as possible. Then place a little extra glue to secure the remaining thread over the ends of the other colors, and trim excess. Repeat the finishing process on the other side of the wrapped hoop. Repeat full process for your other earring. Voila!

 
To create the striped earrings, simply wrap the embroidery threads together at the same time, as if they were one. Keep them in the same alignment as you wrap, and finish with the same process as used above.
 

So fast, easy and fun! Happy Hooping!

50 happy facts to get you in the mood for life

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50 happy facts to get you in the

mood for life

 

 

This is a fab list of things you probably didn’t know.. but are very interesting and nice 🙂

  1. Penguins have one mate for the whole of their lives. They “propose” by giving their mate a pebble.
  2. Cows have best friends.
  3. Not one of your direct ancestors died childless.
  4. Cuddling releases Oxytocin which helps speed healing and recovery from physical wounds.
  5. Otters hold hands when sleeping so they don’t drift away from each other.
  6. The last man to walk on the Moon, Eugene Cernan wrote his daughters initials there. They’ll last 50,000 years at the very least.
  7. There’s a type of jellyfish that lives forever.
  8. We now have less crime, a lower death rate and longer life expectancy than at any other time in human history.
  9. The clitoris has 8000 nerve fibres, double that of the penis, and is the only organ in the body, which has evolved purely for pleasure.
  10. Every year the Netherlands sends 20,000 tulip bulbs to Canada to thank them for their aid in the Second World War.
  11. Rats giggle when you tickle them. Their voices are so high-pitched you need special equipment to hear them, but when you do, their laughs are immediately evident.
  12. Sea horses mate for life, are completely faithful and travel together by holding on to each others tails.
  13. If you say “my cocaine” you sound like Michael Caine saying his own name.
  14. Male puppies, when playing with female puppies, will let the female win. Gentlemen puppies.
  15. The majority of children born in Europe in 2013 will live to see the year 2100.
  16. Seeing somebody else smile actually makes you happier.
  17. Every human spent about half an hour as a single cell.
  18. There are folk out there who are ombrophiles – they have a passionate love for rain.
  19. No matter how old you are there will always be an incredible new food for you try.
  20. The name for a group of porcupines is a prickle.
  21. Smallpox is completely extinct. No one else will ever die from it again.
  22. Pigs’ orgasms last for 30 minutes.
  23. Sloths only leave their tree once a week, to pee and poo.
  24. At the time of your birth, you were, for a few seconds, the youngest person on the planet.
  25. Cows produce the most milk when listening to the song Everybody Hurts by REM.
  26. Someone somewhere is losing their virginity right now.
  27. Baby rabbits are called kittens.
  28. Baby puffins are called pufflings.
  29. Worms communicate by snuggling.
  30. With our horseless carriages (cars), space travel, speed of light communication, cloning, lasers, connection to people worldwide, flying robots, we are living in the future people dreamed of.
  31. A group of flamingos is called a flamboyance.
  32. Cancer death rates are down 20% in past 20 years.
  33. Every year, millions of trees grow thanks to squirrels forgetting where they buried their nuts.
  34. On the day of his assassination, Martin Luther King Jr. had a pillow-fight in his motel room.
  35. The Beatles used the word “love” 613 times throughout their career.
  36. The chances of you (as opposed to someone else) being born is about 1 in 40 million.
  37. The nitrogen in our DNA, the calcium in our teeth, the iron in our blood, the carbon in our apple pies were made in the interiors of collapsing stars. We’re all made of star dust.
  38. Canada is an Indian word meaning “Big Village”.
  39. Iguanas, koalas and Komodo dragons all have two penises
  40. Just like humans, British cows moo in regional accents.
  41. John Cleese’s father’s surname was Cheese. Cleese grew up 10miles from Cheddar and his best friend at school was called Barney Butter.
  42. Under extreme high pressure, diamonds can be made from peanut butter.
  43. Tintin is called Tantan in Japanese because TinTinis pronounced ‘Chin chin’ and means penis.
  44. In 1881, there were only six men in Britain called Derek.
  45. Only 4 Clives and 13 Trevors were born in the UK in 2011.
  46. Everyone knows the dog in the movie “Wizard of Oz” as Toto, the dogs actual name given to it by it’s master was Terry.
  47. Approximately one fifth of all the publications from Japan are comic books.
  48. The microwave was invented after a researcher walked by a radar tube and a chocolate bar melted in his pocket.
  49. Winston Churchill was born in a ladies’ room during a dance.
  50. When Nelson Mandela met the Spice Girls, he called them his “heroes.”

6 steps to improving your photography

Whether you run a blog or an online Etsy store, good photography can really help you and your crafty creations get noticed online.What’s more, you can achieve great results with a regular camera. Claire Gillo explains how

Capture your makes with a compact camera

You’ll need:

Compact Camera

Wooden surface

Large window (natural light)

Craft items to photograph

Step 1

Step 1 Set up your shoot next to a window. We want to use natural light, so around midday is good time as the light is at its best. Find a nice background to frame your subject. A wooden surface works well – we used the side of a toy chest and its lid.

Step 2

Step 2 Next arrange your subject and/or props. Try not to over-prop the shot and choose items and/or colours that complement each other.

 

Step 3

Step 3 Some compact cameras only shoot in a fully automatic mode (if so, skip to Step 5). If your camera can shoot in a part-manual mode put it into the Aperture priority mode (this is often marked as A or Av) as this controls the depth of field in the lens.

Step 4

Step 4 Set the Aperture (depth of field) to the widest setting. This is the smallest number it can go to, and on our camera it’s f/3.5. Using a wide aperture helps blur the background while keeping the foreground object sharp. This creates a softer and ‘dreamier’ image.

Step 5

Step 5 You could also enhance the shot with a photo filter effect. We used the Film Simulation Astia/Soft effect; check your camera manual to see what yours can do. Next, shoot from a low angle, isolating the object/s. Avoid distracting background elements.

Step 6

Step 6 Ensure the focus point stays sharp on the main subject matter. Think about the direction of the main light source. Use faint shadows to give the object/s definition but watch out for heavy casting ones. Once you’re happy, upload it to your blog!

Make your own tent!! :)

DIY A-Frame Tent-A Beautiful Mess We love a-frame tents, so we invited Rubyellen to share her method for making your own. Are you excited? Here’s how the magic happens-A-Frame Tent SuppliesA-Frame Tent Supplies1. From the top of each moulding, measure and mark 6″ down with your pencil. 2. With your drill and 3/4″ spade bit, drill a hole at your mark. Try to center the hole on your moulding. These holes will be for the top of your A-frame tent. 3. From the opposite end of your moulding, measure and mark 1.5″ down with your pencil. 4. With your drill and 3/4″ spade bit, drill a hole at your mark. Try to center the hole on your moulding. These holes will be for the bottom of your A-frame tent. 

A-FRAME TENT DIMENSIONS

Making the cover: Since the cover is made using a vintage crocheted cloth, what you have readily available to use may be a different measurement. The key size to get your tent cover is about 44″ – 51″ in length and about 80″ – 84″ in width, so depending on the size of your crocheted cloth, your crocheted cloth to panel fabric proportion may vary from the one used. In fact, on our tent, the crocheted cover is slightly larger than the fabric panel by an inch or so on each side. If you have a crocheted cover large enough and don’t need a fabric panel, an option would be to fold the bottom of your crocheted cover to create a panel in which to feed your dowel through. Be creative, there are a lot of fun possibilities to use for a tent cover!
(Hint: A twin sized sheet fits this tent frame almost perfectly!)Tent Cover SuppliesTent Cover Supplies1. Cut the fabric to the size needed. In our case, it was 14″ x 53″. For the 14″ side, fold over 1/2″ and press, and fold over 1/2″ again and press. Pin in place. Repeat with the opposite side. Do this for both panels. Then, use a sewing machine to stitch the hem. With the 53″ side, place the right sides together and stitch using a 1/2″ seam. Repeat for second panel. Turn inside out and press. 2. Place the long side of crocheted cloth and fabric together with right sides together, pin in place, and stitch together using a 1/2″ seam. Repeat with second panel for the opposite side. 3. Group dowels into pairs and line up the top holes. Push dowel through the holes of the top moulding (6″ down from top). The hole should have a pretty tight grip and keep the dowel in place. Repeat with the dowels for the opposite end. Drape your tent cover on top. 4. Grab another dowel and push through the holes on the bottom of one side and feed through the bottom panel and connect the dowel to the opposite end. Repeat for second dowel on the opposite side. Open up the tent cover to desired width and height of opening. Grab a pillow, blanket, go underneath and enjoy!
TIPS: For a little extra detail and to keep the tent cover taut, I fed twine through some holes of the cover and tied it to the legs of the frame. This helps prevent the tent cover from sagging. Also, if you are using this on wood floors the legs may have a hard time staying up. I find that if you put your tent on top of a blanket it will help it from just falling flat.
Again, how you make this tent cover will vary depending on the size of the crocheted cover you find and decide to use. I just happen to come across a cover that was almost the exact size I needed, so I didn’t have to really piece together too much. Nevertheless, it will look beautiful with lots of little crocheted pieces put together or even with just one large piece as a cover. Just remember, have fun making it and after you will have a special little hideaway to enjoy! 
DIY A-Frame Tent (A Beautiful Mess) DIY A-Frame Tent (A Beautiful Mess)

 

DIY Dining Plate

DIY Dining Plate

Just drew this on one of my plain plates. I used a sharpie marker pen(thick) and just started to doodle. As always animals came to my mind first, so we have a bird and a butterfly!! Now im going to pop them in the oven for a little while just on a low temp to stick the marker pen onto the plate.

There you have it!! You don’t have to spend loads of cash buying fancy plates, just be creative and make them yourself. Or ill make one for you!! 🙂
xxxx

Experimenting

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Just got some polystyrene from the apples I bought so thought I would give stencilling another go!! I’m gonna keep practicing so I get better and better at it because I like the effects you can make and also my mum bought me loads of ink stamps for Christmas so I need to use them!!! 🙂 if u have any ideas what to draw five me a shout!!! Xx

Wire Wrapped Tree

Wire Wrapped Tree

A great project to try that looks absolutely stunning!!!

This was a very fun project for me.  I have a friend getting married this October in the desert.  I had been thinking I wanted to make a little family tree for her, and with the contest theme being “beads” – I was hit with inspiration.  Why not make an actual tree, with birthstone beads representing their families?  The end result is something that embodies both roots and growth, which is the perfect message for the beginning of a new life together!

 

This is a bit more time-intensive than what I usually show you, but I wanted something special not just for the contest, but also for my friend’s gift.  I would estimate I have about 5 hours into it, because beading and wire wrapping, while not difficult, can be pretty time-intensive.  I did work on it about an hour at a time, so it is something that you can easily put away and come back to later.  I’m also not going to go into a lot of detail here, because this is one of those things where there is no right or wrong, you just have to go with it however it shapes up for you.  I’ll just give you a few pointers.  If you try it, use plenty of wire and do what you like the looks of, and you can’t go wrong. :)

I started with a rock from my yard.  If you attempt this, I have some suggestions.  You definitely want something flat and stable on the bottom, and after putting this together, I was surprised at how heavy the beads were after adding so many.  So I would say, as a general rule, decide how far you want your branches to reach on all sides, and choose a rock that’s an equal diameter.  Mine was slightly more top-heavy than I would have preferred.  It doesn’t just tip over or anything, but I want it to be really safe from getting bumped into.  I will probably mount it on a small wooden base before giving it for added stability (which will also protect any surfaces from that wire under the rock).

First, I cut about 2 dozen lengths of copper and brass wire about 24″ long for a tree about 8″ or 9″ tall.  I used 24 gauge copper and 22 gauge brass… and if I were to do it differently, I would use 24 gauge for the whole thing.  While I love the looks of the two thicknesses, the 22 gauge was too big in diameter for my smaller beads!  Fortunately the larger beads were fine, so I stuck with it, but if you’re shopping – shop for 24 gauge for the whole thing.  So test out your beads and make sure they will work – then, wrap the “roots” around the rock base.

Once you have your roots started, twist your wire to create your trunk.  You’ll want to wrap a few additional times closer to the bottom before moving up to make it thicker at the bottom – more like a natural tree trunk.

Once you’re satisfied with the height, start sorting your wires back out to form branches.  This was my favorite part.  Consider starting each main branch with anywhere between 4-8 strands of wire, give it a twist, and continue separating them and branching them out until you are down to just individual wires.

The beads here represent the people in my friend’s and her fiance’s families.  I did a little research on birthstones, and found that most months are already represented by easily obtainable semi-precious stones.  I was able to find genuine garnet (for January), amethyst (February), peridot (August), and citrine (November).  Diamonds and rubies were of course out of my budget, but with a little more digging I found that carnelian alternatively represents July, and white quartz represents April.  So with everyone finally represented, I got to work beading each branch.

 

Now, I found it most helpful to work from the lower branches and go upward, but there’s no rule.

As you go, just look at your proportions and arrange the beads and branches in a random and natural-looking way.  When I got to the end of each branch, I just coiled up the wire on round-nose pliers, but you could finish it any way that appeals to you.

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