Mala Making

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The Buddhist centre that i live in had a day course on Saturday on Mala Beads! Then we all made our own Malas at the end.. It was fab and my little sister came and made a bracelet!! ūüôā Im quite proud of my Mala im¬†definitely¬†going to use it in the next meditation i do ūüėÄ

Here’s¬†a bit of information on how Malas are used.

A mala is a set of beads commonly used by Hindus and Buddhists. Malas are used for keeping count while reciting, chanting, or mentally repeating a mantra or the name or names of a deity. This practice is known in Sanskrit as japa. Malas are typically made with 16, 27, 54 or 108 beads.

In Tibetan Buddhism, traditionally malas of 108 beads are used. Some practitioners use malas of 21 or 28 beads for doingprostrations. Doing one 108-bead mala counts as 100 mantra recitations; the extra repetitions are done to amend any mistakes.

Malas are mainly used to count mantras. These mantras can be recited for different purposes linked to working with mind. The material used to make the beads can vary according to the purpose of the mantras used. Some beads can be used for all purposes and all kinds of mantras. These beads can be made from the wood of the Bodhi tree (ficus religiosa), or from ‘Bodhi seeds,’ which come from the¬†Rudraksha (Elaeocarpus ganitrus)¬†and not the Bodhi tree. Another general-purpose mala is made from¬†rattan seeds (Calamus Arecaceae), the beads themselves called ‘Moon and Stars’ by Tibetans, and variously called ‘lotus root’, ‘lotus seed’ and ‘linden nut’ by various retailers. The bead itself is very hard and dense, ivory coloured (which gradually turns a deep golden brown with long use), and has small holes (moons) and tiny black dots (stars) covering its surface.

Pacifying mantras should be recited using white colored malas. Materials such as¬†crystal,¬†pearl, shell/conch or¬†mother of pearl¬†are preferable. These are said to purify the mind and clear away obstacles like illness, bad karma and mental disturbances. Using pearls is not practical however, as repeated use will destroy their iridescent layer. Most often pearl malas are used for showing off or ‘Dharma jewelry’.

Increasing mantras should be recited using malas of¬†gold,¬†silver,¬†copper¬†and amber. The mantras counted on these can “serve to increase life span, knowledge and merit.”

Mantras for magnetizing should be recited using malas made of saffron, lotus seed, sandalwood, or other forms of wood includingelm wood, peach wood, and rosewood. However, it is said the most effective is made of Mediterranean oxblood coral, which, due to a ban on harvesting, is now very rare and expensive.

Mantras to tame by forceful means should be recited using malas made of Rudraksha beads or bone. Reciting mantras with this kind of mala is said to tame others, but with the motivation to unselfishly to help other sentient beings.¬†Malas to tame by forceful means or subdue harmful energies, such as “extremely malicious spirits, or general afflictions”, are made from Rudraksha seeds, or even¬†human bones, with 108 beads on the string. It is said that only a person that is motivated by great compassion for all beings, including those they try to tame, can do this.

The mala string should be composed of three, five or nine threads, symbolizing the Three Jewels (Buddha, Dharma, Sangha), the five Dhyani Buddhas (Vairocana, Akshobhya, Ratnasambhava, Amitabha, Amoghasiddhi) and their wisdoms or the nine yanas or Buddha Vajradhara and eight Bodhisattvas. The large main bead, called the Guru bead, symbolizes the Guru, from whom one has received the mantra one is reciting. It is usually recommended that there be three vertical beads in decreasing size at this point: one white (Nirmanakaya) one red (Sambhogakaya) and one blue (Dharmakaya), or enlightened body, speech and mind.

Mantras are typically repeated hundreds or even thousands of times. The mala is used so that one can focus on the meaning or sound of the mantra rather than counting its repetitions¬†One repetition is usually said for each bead while turning the thumb¬†clockwise¬†around each bead, though some traditions or practices may call for counterclockwise motion or specific hand and finger usage. When arriving at the Guru bead, both Hindus and Buddhists traditionally turn the mala around and then go back in the opposing direction. Within the Buddhist tradition, this reversing of the beads serves to remind practitioners of the teaching that it is possible to break the cycle of birth and death. If more than 108 repetitions are to be done, then sometimes in Tibetan traditions grains of rice are counted out before the chanting begins and one grain is placed in a bowl for each 108 repetitions.¬†Each time a full mala of repetitions has been completed, one grain of rice is removed from the bowl. Many Tibetan Buddhists have bell and dorje counters (a short string of ten beads, usually silver, with a bell or dorje at the bottom), the dorje counter used to count each round of 100, and the bell counter to count 1,000 mantras per bead. These counters are placed at different points on the mala depending on tradition, sometimes at the 10th, 21st or 25th bead from the Guru bead. Traditionally, one begins the mala in the direction of the dorje (skillful means) proceeding on to the bell (wisdom) with each round. A ‘bhum’ counter, often a small brass or silver clasp in the shape of a jewel or wheel, is used to count 10,000 repetitions, and is moved forward between the main beads of the mala, starting at the Guru bead, with each accumulation of 10,000

Bunting bonkers.

All of the gorgeous fabric I’ve made into bunting for the meditation cafe in Darlington!!!
It will make the cafe feel really homely and nice, so everyone who lives near Darlington better come along and grab yourself a coffee!! It’s a lovely atmosphere and really pleasant volunteers who work there. I’m going to set up some craft lessons aswel to teach basic sewing and other bits and bobs ūüôā hope you like the hunting though!! It will be up in the windows soon!!! ūüôā

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Madhyamaka Centre

I have just been to a Buddhist Retreat in Pocklington and it was so relaxing and wonderful. I really recommend everyone to go who is wanting a lovely holiday and to be taught such wonderful views. I stayed for the weekend and had a single room which was very clean and welcoming. I attended meditations, teachings, discussions, prayers.. all of which i have never done before! I met some lovely people who i will remember for a long time and found out interesting beliefs which has changed my views on many things.

“Lamrim, or stages of the path, is a special presentation of Buddha‚Äôs teachings showing us in a step-by-step way how to begin, progress and complete the path to perfect happiness, enlightenment.”

 

http://www.madhyamaka.org/ << the website i booked my weekend on.

There are over 1,100 Kadampa centres and branches throughout the world! Not just Pocklington! Just have a look at the site and see if anything interests you ūüôā